Page 97 - Microsoft Word - 2011 CAFR.doc

Basic HTML Version

COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT
ESCAMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA 
NOTES TO COMBINED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 
69 
Significant Commitments
 – The Sheriff entered into a cancelable agreement with a vendor to provide 
management services, food, materials, and supplies necessary to feed the inmate population at the corrections 
facility and the Escambia County Jail, through February 28, 2011.  Food service expense under this contract for the 
year ended September 30, 2011 was approximately $1.7 million. 
Operating leases
 for the Tax Collector consist of a lease for office space with noncancellable terms in excess of one 
year as of September 30, 2011.  Rent expense for the year ended September 30, 2011 was approximately 
$351,000.   
Future minimum payments, as of September 30, 2011 for the Tax Collector, are as follows: 
Tax
Collector
Year
Amount
2012
$313,660
2013
174,494
2014
123,660
2015
124,055
$735,869
NOTE 5 – CONTINGENT LIABILITIES 
The County is a defendant in various lawsuits.  Although the outcome of these lawsuits is not presently 
determinable, in the opinion of the County Attorney the resolution of these matters will not have a material 
adverse effect on the financial condition of the County. 
The County receives significant financial assistance from federal and state agencies primarily in the form of capital 
and operating grants.  The disbursement of funds received under these programs generally requires compliance 
with terms and conditions specified in the grant agreements and is subject to audit by grantor agencies.  
Disallowed claims, if any, resulting from such audits may become liabilities of the County.  However, in the opinion 
of management, disallowed claims, if any, will not have a material effect on the County’s financial statements. 
The First District Court of Appeals upheld the issue of taxability of land, improvements, and condominium units 
located on Santa Rosa Island (also referred to as Pensacola Beach) but held that the valuations proposed by the 
County for certain condominium improvements (Portofino) was not correct.  So while the Courts have ruled in 
favor of the County on the taxability of the land and improvements, the Tax Collector will be refunding those 
taxpayers at Portofino who paid taxes in excess of the valuation found by the trial court.  The County’s 
approximate share of the net refund amount for Portofino’s court‐ordered refunds is $1.6 million. 
The First District Court of Appeals has also certified a question of great public importance to the Florida Supreme 
Court on the residential improvements case, styled 1108 Ariola v. Jones.  The Florida Supreme Court may or nay 
not decide to accept jurisdiction on this case.  If the Florida Supreme Court does not take the case, the matter will 
be over for these taxpayers.  If the Florida Supreme Court accepts jurisdiction of the case, the Court will require 
additional briefing and argument before the matter is finally resolved.